I draw stuff

adventuretimetimeline:

turkoff:

A few of my favorite pictures from our Steampunk Adventure Time photo shoot from Otakon 2014!

Finn - Me

Princess Bubblegum - bui-chan

Designs - micaella

Photographer - https://www.facebook.com/cassimonee

eneko-wweh
If you're looking to write a deaf/Deaf character or understand Deaf culture, I recommend looking for Deaf or ASL blogs with subtitles on YouTube. Also research the difference between deaf and Deaf, as it would affect the character immensely.

characterdesigninspiration:

Awesome, thanks for the advice!

cchtml:

This feeling when you walk into big art supply stores …

kelpls:

THERE ARE DIFFERENT KINDS OF PEONIES idk which one so i just drew the one that most people use

I’m sorry it’s no vrery detailed lies on my side

lohrien:

Illustrations by PinkParasol (Annie Stegg)

Foam and Worbla armour MEGA TUTORIAL

Tutorial by AmenoKitarou

disneyconceptsandstuff:

James Lopez, a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman), is currently trying to raise money for his traditionally animated project Hullabaloo. Hullabaloo is a steampunk short film which Lopez is hoping will help save the cause of 2D animation, and possibly lead to a TV series or film. So, if you’re interested in badass steampunk ladies or traditional animation, may I recommend you give a dollar or two. Hullabaloo's IndieGogo page is over here, visit to donate and learn more! And I’ll conclude with the plot: 

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

Together, Veronica and Jules learn that Jonathan Daring has been kidnapped by a mysterious group of influential persons, who seek to use his latest invention for nefarious purposes. These villains are wealthy and influential and neither Veronica nor Jules can stop them openly. But determined to save her father and holding true to the family creed that technology should be used for the good of all, not the greed of some, Veronica assumes the secret identity of “Hullabaloo”, a goggled crusader who uses wits and science to combat evil and oppose the nefarious conspiracy that has taken her father.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

kennoarkkan:

shadyfolk:

amaipetisu:

A few tips everybody should consider. I’ve experienced all those and some more. I’m not good at english but I hope you get it. Go and support some artists out there and let them draw you nice shit. Not as nice as FairyNekoDesu but still will be cool so give them a chance and you’ll be surprised.

THIIIIS.

All of these things.

Especially the deadline. If you don’t have a deadline thats way in advanced it’s not gonna get done by then. I am almost always taking on a ton of projects at once and sometimes need a break from it to: work on stuff for me, work on stuff for friends, search for jobs, be the work slave of parents, actually relax and try to relief stress, technical difficulties, researching on how to do stuff, ect.

Sometimes it’s done in a day. Sometimes it’s done literally a year later. But I always update the people I work with so they know I haven’t forgotten.

Do NOT rush your commissioner. Let them work at their pace and it will be worth it. Rushing them insures a rush job which will very likely make the quality decline.

All this is true. Also, ref sheets are the most important thing ever. I can’t stress that enough. They make the job A LOT easier (instead of having to compare 10 different pics between each other and see that everything fits, you just look at 1!!)  If you plan in commissioning your character a lot, or even if its not yours (like from an anime or something) Either commission one or look for ref sheets of the show (because there are!).

Also i strongly suggest not using Instant Messaging. Information can be lost pretty easily there and it’s hard to come back to it. Use emails instead. The info stays there, and it’s easy to search for it. It’s also an excellent way to keep track of the descriptions, so if either the client or artist made a mistake, you can see the email threads and see who’s right straight away.

also pushy clients LOVE instant messaging. Pls no.

thegloober:

Bird legs and also hands. Did these little sketch notes to help out Michaela and Kitten, respectively.

First one doesn’t make a ton of sense since I was explaining half of it in skype, but essentially showing how drawing the fingertips first and then connecting them to the hand helps a bit.